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Race Discrimination In Education: Tips For Teachers For Avoiding Prejudice

Posted by on Aug 9, 2016 in Uncategorized |

One of the first anti-discrimination laws in the United States was the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Because any violation of this law can result in civil action against your school and district, it’s important that, as a teacher, you leave any preconceived notions at the door of your classroom and treat all your students equally. While most modern teachers would never dream of considering themselves to harbor prejudices against racial minorities, racial trouble still exists. According to one study, there are 149 suspensions for a group of 100 black students, while only 32 for the same amount of white students. Here are some areas where race still affects the classroom and what you can do to avoid it.  1. Low expectations.  Some teachers believe they are being fair or understanding by lowering their expectations for minority students. For example, teachers may not offer extra credit to black or hispanic students, or they may convey that they expect these students to perform poorly on tests. Teachers may offer less help or less vigorous assignments, ultimately lowering the quality of education that minority students receive. As a teacher, you should offer the same opportunities for advancement to all students, and if minority students in poverty are not performing well, this doesn’t mean that teachers should lower their expectations for minority students across the board, or even for the struggling student. White students are more likely to get the benefit of the doubt from teachers, and are allowed to excel despite setbacks at home. Strive to give all students the “benefit” treatment by offering alternative assignments and keeping your expectations for their success and excellence high.  2. Making assumptions. Hollywood and other media depictions of race can be damaging for educators. Even movies that show benevolent teachers getting into urban, low-income schools and lifting self-depreciating students out of poverty and into college can be damaging. Teachers in these situations should not see themselves as saviors who can help their students break the cycle of poverty. Making assumptions that all minority students in your class struggle financially and domestically leads to unequal treatment in the classroom. Other common assumptions include that all Black, Latino, or Asian students share a common culture or background.  If you keep your mind open and build your classroom community by carefully getting to know the background of each student, you will discover that not all students come from broken homes; many have parents with good jobs and steady relationships. Many have family members who are college educated. Not all students will be familiar with street language, drugs, or gangs. It’s also your job to help your diverse students understand their peers. Spend several weeks at the beginning of the school year on introductions, break the ice games, and team building exercises. Have students write essays on their favorite things or about their neighborhood. You’ll get a better idea of the unique background of each student, regardless of race. 3. Harsher punishment. Unfortunately, Black and Latino students still face harsher punishments more frequently in the classroom. These students are still viewed as trouble makers and teachers have a lower threshold for unacceptable behavior when it comes to these minority groups. You cannot let yourself become one of these people. The best way to avoid it is to have...

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2 Ways Marijuana Use Can Result in Denial of Disability Benefits

Posted by on Jun 24, 2016 in Uncategorized |

Although the tide has turned in favor of legalizing possession and use of marijuana (it is currently legal in 25 states and Washington D.C.) that does not mean people who smoke cannabis won’t experience any consequences from consuming this drug. In fact, if you’re seeking Social Security disability benefits, marijuana use can have a negative impact on your case. Here are two ways smoking cannabis can result in denial of benefits. The Drug Contributes to the Disability The Social Security Administration (SSA) won’t automatically deny your application if you admit to using marijuana. However, the agency will evaluate your case to see how much affect it has on your disability. The SSA’s policy regarding drug and alcohol use is to determine whether the substance contributes to your disability in a material way. If it does, then your request for disability may be denied. When making its determination, the SSA will evaluate whether you would still be disabled if you stopped using marijuana; so your specific disability will have some influence on the administration’s findings. For instance, if you’re paralyzed from the waist down, your marijuana use will likely be considered irrelevant, since you would still be paralyzed even if you stopped using the drug. Because marijuana primarily affects the brain and lungs, people with mental illnesses, brain disorders, and lung diseases may face greater scrutiny than those who are disabled in other ways. For instance, high doses of THC—the active ingredient in cannabis—appears to worsen some mental illnesses, such as depression. So if you are claiming disability based on severe depression, the SSA may feel your marijuana use is contributing to the problem. They may deny your claim based on this or you may be required to submit evidence showing the drug has a minimal impact on your condition. You’re Not Following the Doctor’s Orders The Social Security Administration expects applicants to follow the treatments prescribed for their disabilities by their healthcare providers. This is likely because the agency expects people to do what they can to increase their chances of returning to or obtaining employment as soon as possible, particularly in cases where the disability is temporary. You may be denied disability benefits if marijuana use is prohibited by the doctor or it worsens your condition in some way. If you have COPD, for example, your claim may be rejected if you smoke marijuana, since smoking this substance can worsen lung function. Another issue is the SSA requires treatments to be effective enough to restore a person’s ability to work in cases where a person’s condition can be improved that much. The agency may not accept a prescribed cannabis treatment if there is no reliable evidence it is effective for the condition it’s supposed to help. For instance, some people use marijuana to help alleviate symptoms of multiple sclerosis. However, the evidence supporting the efficacy of this drug on MS symptoms is mixed. Additionally, the side effects of using cannabis (e.g. reduced mental acuity) may negatively impact a person’s ability to obtain or maintain employment, which the SSA may find undesirable. If the SSA challenges your application for benefits based on this issue, you will need to provide proof that either the drug is not having a negative impact on your condition or the benefits of using it...

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Medical Marijuana And Workers Compensation May Not Mix

Posted by on May 13, 2016 in Uncategorized |

If you have been injured on the job, it is not unusual to be sent for a drug screen following your injury. What is found during this drug screen can have a direct impact on whether or not your worker’s compensation claim may be approved. But what happens when the drug in your system is marijuana that has been approved by your doctor for your use to address a medical condition that you have? Even if it is legal in your state, your employer may still have a right to deny your claim, and may even have grounds to dismiss you from your job for having a positive drug screen. Here are a few points you may want to consider prior to lighting up. If It Is Legal In My State, Why Can I Get In Trouble At Work? Over the last few years the legalization of medical marijuana has been front and center in the news and on voting ballots in many states. Currently, 24 states and Washington, DC, have approved this plant for medical purposes. This legalization varies from state to state, but most laws allow you to grow, purchase, possess, and smoke marijuana for a wide variety of medical conditions and concerns.  Unfortunately, medical marijuana has not been approved on the federal level. Marijuana continues to be classified as a Schedule I drug, but the federal Department of Justice has given states some leeway in enforcing drug laws as they see fit, and have allowed them to create state laws surrounding its use. Because it is illegal on a federal level, this has a direct impact on your company’s worker’s compensation policies, as well as on their insurer’s approvals. If I Just Use Marijuana On The Weekends When I Am Off How Long Will It Remain In My System? Even if you only use marijuana on the weekends, it does not mean that it has completely left your system by the time you report to work on Monday morning. That is because the THC, or the molecules that are being tested for, are lipolphilic or fat soluble and are stored in your body fat. Because it is stored this way, it is harder to flush from your system and remains longer than other types of recreational drugs. How long it remains in your system is dependent on several things. Some of these include: How often you use it The period of time you use it over Percentage of your body fat Your exercise patterns Stress levels Your diet and more Your occasional weekend use can usually be detected by regular drug screens that measure the carboxy-THC, or the breakdown of the marijuana, anywhere from 3 to 10 days after use. If you are a heavy user, testing may show the drug in your system for up to 10 months, even after you have ceased to use it. The levels in your system may even increase or peak on your body for days following your use. Why Is My Employer Concerned About My Occasional Use? Everyone who uses marijuana is affected differently. These differences are due to the amount, as well as how the drug is ingested, the person’s size and body composition.    The drug can impact some or all of the following: Short-term memory Balance and coordination Concentration Alertness Sensory perception Ability to perform complex...

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Should You Consider A Lawsuit Loan?

Posted by on Apr 8, 2016 in Uncategorized |

Between medical bills, car repairs, and lost wages, the aftermath of a car accident is an expensive time. Unfortunately, lawsuit settlements don’t always come quickly. It can take months or sometimes even years to reach a settlement or receive a judgement in your favor, even if you have a good case and a great lawyer. But your bills don’t stop piling up while you’re waiting. To address this need, there are companies that make lawsuit loans to plaintiffs – money that you can use now that will be paid back upon receipt of your settlement. But are these loans a good idea? Take a look at a few things that you need to know about lawsuit loans. How the Loans Work Lawsuit loans are fairly easy to get, if you have a good case. The loan company doesn’t check your credit the way a traditional lender would. Instead, the lender will talk to your attorney and look over documents from your court case to decide how likely you are to win your lawsuit. If they determine that you’re a good risk, you’ll get the loan. Because this process bypasses the usual credit checks, you can get your money fairly quickly. You most likely won’t be allowed to borrow the full amount of your potential settlement. Instead, you and your lawyer will negotiate an amount, along with the interest and fees that will need to be paid back. Then, if you win your lawsuit, that amount goes to your lender. If you happen to lose your lawsuit, you won’t be required to repay the loan – this is a risk the lender takes, and it’s one of the reasons why the fees tend to be high. If you win, but get less than expected, you and your attorney may be able to negotiate lower fees or a payment plan. Lawsuit Loans and Attorney/Client Privilege You can’t get a lawsuit loan without your attorney’s involvement. Partly because the lender needs to verify that you’re likely to win your case and partly because they need to make sure that you’re not promising to pay back more money than you can afford once attorney’s fees and other expenses are taken into account. The chances are very good that your attorney will try to dissuade you from taking out a lawsuit loan. In fact, some personal injury attorney refuse to work with lawsuit lenders at all. Why? Partly because lawsuit loans are a bit like payday loans – they have high fees and interest and are rarely a good financial decision. But another problem is that lawsuit loans may damage your attorney/client privilege. You already know that any details of your case discussed between you can your attorney are confidential. Neither you nor your attorney can be compelled to disclose that information. What you may not know is that there are circumstances that can break attorney client privilege, and one of those circumstances is involving a third party in confidential discussions or discussing confidential information with a third party after the fact. Many attorneys worry that sharing information with lawsuit lenders breaks privilege, making formerly privileged information admissible in court. In most cases, the lenders do not need confidential information. And in some cases, privilege may be extended to communications shared with a lender....

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Sports Stadium Injuries: 5 Factors That May Impact Your Case

Posted by on Mar 14, 2016 in Uncategorized |

Attending a sports game at a stadium is thrilling and exciting, but it also has dangers associated with it. Whether you’re attending a baseball game, football game, or even a large pro-wrestling event, you should not be held responsible for injuries that occur to you while attending a stadium. If you have been injured at a stadium, it’s a good idea to consult with a lawyer and determine your options for seeking a settlement. As the case is built, there are five factors that may impact the case. Each of the factors focuses on different stadium elements that may have caused the injury when it could have been prevented in the first place. Walking Conditions With thousands of people coming to and from their seats, one of the more common incidents in a stadium is a slip and fall accident. Hundreds of beverages, food items, and other debris can easily lead to a fall down stadium steps or in various aisles. If you have fallen in a stadium, your lawyer can try to prove neglect on the stadium for not providing proper walkways. Evidence will be collected to showcase what caused the accident, approximately how long the debris was there, and the job function of cleaning crews hired by the stadium. All of these factors can help with your settlement case and seeking proper compensation for injuries. Crowds Stadiums love to fill to capacity to make the most profits and create an exciting live environment. Overcrowding is another way that injuries can occur. People can get trampled, bumped, or shoved to the ground. If this is the case, not only can the person who caused the accident be liable, but the stadium could be liable too for overcrowding. A personal injury lawyer can look into the fire code for the stadium and maximum occupancy. If that occupancy was overfilled, then the stadium could be held liable for the injury that occurred. Proper crowd control is important, too. Improper lines or barriers inside the stadium can easily create chaos and cause injuries to occur. Sound Systems & Crowd Noise The stadium environment is a place that encourages sound and loud noises. High crowd noises and stadium sound systems could lead to hearing issues, especially if you are exposed to them for prolonged periods of time. To help encourage fans, many stadiums use gongs, horns, and large speakers to blast noise through the stands. If you leave a stadium with ringing ears, you could be diagnosed with tinnitus, a ringing or buzzing ear condition that could become permanent. An attorney can look into these noise levels and ways that stadiums encouraged them throughout the event. The stadium could be held liable for your hearing damage, and the noise factors could become an important factor in your case. Fireworks & Pyrotechnics Player entrances, touchdown celebrations, and the National Anthem are just a few occasions where fireworks and other pyrotechnics are used during a stadium event. While they can create a nice visual spectacle, the use of them could be related to possible injuries. The flames and blasts from fireworks could be a cause of an injury. The fireworks go off course, they could burn parts of your skin and lead to additional injuries. Heavy use of fireworks could also lead to smoke...

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Will Marijuana Legalization Provide Post-Conviction Relief to Defendants?

Posted by on Feb 8, 2016 in Uncategorized |

About 23 states have enacted laws legalizing some form of marijuana use and/or possession. While this lets many people use the drug without fear of being arrested, those convicted of marijuana-related crimes may wonder if the change in the law means an early release from jail for them or at least an expungement of charges from their criminal records. Unfortunately, the laws in the United States may not permit this type of post-conviction relief. Here’s more information about this issue. Retroactive Ameliorative Relief is not Guaranteed The United States is one of 22 countries where retroactive ameliorative relief from conviction of crimes that have since been legalized is not a guaranteed right. As it stands now, some prisoners are trapped in time. They must continue to live out the criminal consequences of using or possessing marijuana when it was illegal, even though they may live in a state where it has since been legalized. This is particularly true of people who were convicted of crimes at the federal level. Even though marijuana may be legal in certain states, use, possession, and distribution of the drug continues to be prohibited by federal law. So even if all 50 states legalized marijuana, people in federal prisons would still be required to finish out their sentences if federal laws remain the same. While the country may not have retroactive ameliorative relief laws in place at the federal level, however, some individual states do. This means that people who live in states where changes in the law are able to be retroactively applied can petition the court to overturn their sentences and possibly be set free early from jail. For instance, in March 2014, the Colorado Court of Appeals ruled in favor of a woman who requested to have her conviction for marijuana possession overturned because the state had legalized the drug. The judges unanimously agreed that Colorado’s Amendment 64, which was passed in 2012, should be applied retroactively to people who were convicted under previous laws prohibiting use and possession. Therefore Coloradoans serving time may be able to affect an early release or get the charges taken off their criminal records by appealing their convictions in court. Caveats It’s important to note that only those whose convictions match the changes in the law are eligible for retroactive ameliorative relief. For instance, Colorado allows people 21 and over to possess one ounce of marijuana at a time, so only people who were convicted of possession of one ounce or less of marijuana would be eligible to appeal their convictions under retroactive ameliorative relief laws. If you had more than an ounce of marijuana, were under 21, or were convicted of other crimes in addition to the possession charge, then you may not be able to use the law to overturn your conviction. Alternative to Retroactive Ameliorative Relief Even though a state may not have retroactive ameliorative relief laws in place, it may still be possible to get out of jail early by submitting a request for a pardon or commuted sentence based on the legalization of marijuana. While pardons and commuted sentences don’t remove the crime from your record or change your plea from guilty to innocent, it is one way to get out of jail. Be aware, though, that pardons and commuted...

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Shoplifting Crimes: 5 Ways Technology Can Impact Your Case

Posted by on Jan 18, 2016 in Uncategorized |

Getting caught shoplifting can potentially lead to jail time. Every case is different, especially in the world of shoplifting. Different factors in a shoplifting case include the time you were caught, the value of the items, and any other past crimes that you are on your record. Along with these details in the case, technology could have a big impact. This is why consulting with and hiring a criminal law attorney is essential for breaking your case down and getting the best defense possible. Browse through five different ways that technology can impact a shoplifting charge and see how they can possibly help your case. Digital Video Surveillance The world of digital surveillance has greatly changed as VHS tapes and DVDs got replaced by hard drives that could hold months and years of footage. The quality of the footage has also improved, making it easier to spot shoplifting cases. One of the biggest keys in your case is the statue of limitations on the theft crimes. As loss prevention specialists browse through hours of footage, they may come across your theft and try to charge you with the crime. A criminal law attorney can look into these limitations and see if they are even valid for your case. Every state has different limitations and they can vary based on the value of the theft. Your criminal law attorney will investigate the statues, past cases, and various ways this can impact your case. If the footage is not seen soon enough, your entire case could be thrown out. Facial Recognition Software Newer technology gives stores the ability to run automatic scans through surveillance footage using facial recognition software. Once you have been charged with a crime, the software may be run to look for your face and see if you have shoplifted any other times. If more footage is found, this can become a key part of your case. Your defense attorney can get this footage and examine the accuracy of the facial recognition. For example, someone that looks similar to you may have shopped at the store and come up in the software. Your lawyer can challenge the evidence and try to get it thrown out against your case. Prior Crimes If video footage technology is used as evidence against you, then that same evidence can be used to increase your charges and possibly transition from a misdemeanor to a felony. Your criminal lawyer will try to keep the charges are low as possible. By trying to lessen the charges, you may be able to avoid jail time. If the charges are increased to a felony, you may be at risk for jail time. If these prior crimes are a large factor in your case, you may need to consider plea deals to avoid possible jail times or felony charges. Petit Theft In some cases, the digital technology may work in favor for your case. For example, if you are caught in the act, but didn’t actually leave the store because they suspected you in through security monitors, then you will likely get charged with petit theft or petty theft. This intention of theft may be harder to prove than if you actually left the store. By working with a defense attorney, there may be explanations to the reason...

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4 Myths About Divorce Mediation

Posted by on Dec 21, 2015 in Uncategorized |

One of the biggest problems that couples face when going through a divorce is the fact that they see it as a battle. This need not be the case, especially if you have children and simply want what is best for them. A divorce mediation is a process where an attempt is made to work out everything as amiably as possible. This means that both parties will attempt to work out what is in each other’s best interest. However, much like many other legal issues, divorce mediation is also subject to myths and downright lies. Throughout the course of this brief article, you will learn about 4 of the specific myths associated with divorce mediation. Only Attorneys and Former Judges Can Mediate Although mediation is usually seen as the bread and butter of divorce attorneys and former judges, the fact of the matter is, there is no professional status that a mediator has to have. In fact, during the process of mediation, an attorney or former judge will be unable to confer legal advice to you. In many cases, a mediator will often times be a counselor or someone working in the mental health field. A mediator is someone who has to navigate tricky emotional territory and redirect some attempts at either you or your spouse to manipulate or undermine one another. Couples With A High Net Worth Should Not Mediate In maintaining a solution that is mutually beneficial for both parties, net worth is an issue that generally does not come into play. Finding a solid line of communication and determining what is best for your family is something that goes beyond net worth and aggregate salaries, and your high net worth should not dissuade you from deciding on mediation for your divorce. A mediator should be someone who is not too terribly concerned with determining how much money each party “deserves”, but rather, what is beneficial for both parties and, if you have children, ultimately, what is best for them. A mediator should also not be afraid to bring in other outside sources to determine the best course of action. This occasionally means that one party will receive a greater deal of the assets than the other, but this should be committed in the name of objectivity and mutual beneficence. Gender Lines Many people assume that if you are a man and your mediator is a woman, the mediator is going to simply side with your wife, and vice versa. However, it is a mediator’s job to remain neutral during the proceedings. This means that the only time that your mediator will spend with either of you is during the time that all three of you are together. A good mediator works towards achieving sustainable outcomes that work for both parties. A mediator should not, in any case, meet for a one on one meeting with you or your spouse, as doing so would undermine the objectivity of their profession. I Need The Mediator On My Side A mediator is often times confused with an arbitrator. An arbitrator also meets with couples outside of the courtroom, but they hear both sides of the story and make a binding decision. A mediator cannot make a binding decision but only aims towards helping the couple make the decision that...

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As A Grandparent, Do You Know Your Visitation Rights?

Posted by on Dec 8, 2015 in Uncategorized |

Many times when a marriage ends up in divorce court and there is a custody battle, the court is only able to see the husband and wife.  They are not able to see the extended family members, especially the grandparents, who will also be directly impacted by any orders handed down by the court. In certain divorce cases, when it comes to visitation, the grandparents may have a right to be seen. They may also have a right to file their own request for visitation.  What Are Grandparent Visitation Rights? All fifty states have some type of statute in place that gives grandparents the right to ask the court to grant them visitation with their grandchildren. Many of these statutes were put into place due to the difficulty that the grandparents of the non-custodial parents have in maintaining contact following a divorce, incarceration, or even the death of the non-custodial parent.  Although these laws vary greatly from state to state, and the granting of the requests vary from court to court, the opportunity to receive visitation through this route does exist. Most states have one of two types of statutes, although some states incorporate both into their laws. These are: Restrictive visitation statutes are found in approximately 20 states. In these states, the only grandparents that are able to file for visitation are those who are directly affected by the couple divorcing, or in the case that one of the parents has died. Permissive visitation statutes allows the court to consider the petitions of any grandparents, or even other third parties, even if there has been no death or divorce, as long as this visitation is in the best interest of the child. Who May Seek Visitation Under Grandparent Visitation Statutes? The legal definition of a grandparent is the father or mother of a person’s own father or mother, although the definition is often broadened to include step-mothers and fathers. Fortunately for many children, there are others who have been willing to fill in the roles of grandparents without actually having legal standing. These are often: Other relatives Close friends Foster parents, and others Some permissive states will even allow these third parties to file a petition for visitation under the grandparents right laws. Unlike legal grandparents, the third parties will usually have to show that the child has lived with them, or they have had a close prior relationship with the child. What Happens if the Parent Or Parents Object? Unfortunately, some parents of the child or children, may not want the grandparents to have visitation or any type of contact with the child. In many states, the parents of the child have the right to object to the court granting this type of visitation. They often view this type of court order as an infringement on their rights to raise their children as they see fit.  This challenge was heard by the U.S. Supreme Court In 2000 in the case of Troxel v. Granville. In this case the court struck down a Washington state visitation statute and ruled that a law that allows a petition to be granted over the parental objections infringes on that parents’ right to rear their children. This requires the court to give more weight to the opinion of parents in these types of cases....

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Tips For Legally Protecting Yourself As A Small Business Owner

Posted by on Oct 30, 2015 in Uncategorized |

There are many different laws that can affect small business owners, and it can make it difficult for any new entrepreneur to keep things straight. This can lead to a variety of struggles, including the potential for lawsuits. It’s important that you protect your business from risks like these, but that means being familiar with the laws that can put you at risk. Here are a few of the most common mistakes that new entrepreneurs can make and some tips to help you avoid them. Using Cookie-Cutter Contracts With so many legal resources freely available online, many business owners grab standard contract templates from websites. Unfortunately, these cookie-cutter contracts aren’t always all that they seem. Although the standard contract form makes it easy for you as a business owner, there’s always a risk of holes in the contract language. This can result in contracts that aren’t enforceable or contracts that are missing a key factor of protection for your company. In fact, contracts can be invalidated in court because of a single missing word. With business contracts being so important, you need to be sure that they are correct. The best thing you can do to ensure that your company is protected is to have your contracts written to suit the situation by working with a corporate attorney. Making Employer Mistakes As an employer, you’re bound by a specific set of regulations. There are certain things you’re prohibited from asking and specific guidelines to define employees. Making mistakes in these areas can be costly to your business. Confusing Employees and Contractors Hiring employees can be costly, particularly when you account for things like unemployment insurance, benefits and employer taxes. By the time it all adds up, you may actually pay almost as much in added taxes and fees as you pay your employee. That doesn’t include the cost for equipment, training and recruiting fees. You might think you can save a lot of money by hiring those same workers as independent contractors. Unfortunately, there are some pretty specific guidelines about what constitutes an employee as compared to a contractor. The IRS defines those two roles distinctly, and confusing them could be costly. You’ll face fines and past-due taxes if you declare an independent contractor who should technically be an employee. It’s important that you have a corporate attorney who can help you make the distinction between the two. Asking Illegal Questions When you’re interviewing potential employees for a job, you need to understand what you can legally ask. There are certain questions that are prohibited by law, and asking any of them could leave you facing a lawsuit from a candidate. For example, inquiring about someone’s family status is prohibited. While you cannot ask if they are married or have children, you can legally ask if they have ever held a job under a different name. You also cannot ask about a candidate’s nationality. Even if you’re interviewing someone with a clear accent, you’re not legally permitted to question the origin of that accent. You are, however, typically permitted to ask an employee or prospective employee if they are bilingual if it can affect their job duties or you’re in need of a candidate who speaks a second language. Making an investment in a small business is anything but...

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3 Tips For Buying A Home With Cash

Posted by on Oct 2, 2015 in Uncategorized |

If you have the funds to pay for your next house in cash, doing so may be a good choice for you. Cash buyers have some distinct advantages when it comes to the negotiations process. You can close the deal faster and with less fuss than someone who has to go through a mortgage approval process. For a seller who’s motivated to get rid of their old house and move on, a buyer with cash in hand is an attractive proposition. You may even be able to leverage your position to get a better deal on the price of the house. However, buying a house with cash isn’t as simple as buying an item at a store. Take a look at a few tips that can help you buy a home with cash. Take Stock of Your Finances You can’t pour all of your funds into a house and leave yourself without the money you’ll need to cover emergencies, repairs, or living expenses. You’ll need to take stock of your finances ahead of time to figure out if you have enough to buy the house and cover the costs of any necessary home repairs, legal issues with the home’s title, and your ordinary expenses. You will save money upfront by buying a house with cash, because you won’t have to pay a loan origination fee, closing costs, or other lenders fees. You’ll also save by not paying interest on a loan every month. However, you’ll be losing money in other ways. For example, you’ll be missing out on the tax breaks that you would have gotten with a mortgage – for a home loan under one million dollars, the interest is fully tax deductible. You can make up that shortfall by calculating what you would have spent in interest each month had you gotten a loan, and depositing that money in a high-interest-bearing savings account or other financial product instead. Don’t Skip the Home Inspection Without a mortgage lender calling the shots, you can avoid the home inspection if you want to – but don’t. As a cash buyer, your purchase will move more speedily than the typical home purchase, so you’ll have fewer opportunities to discover problems with the house or change your mind. You’ll be doing yourself a favor by slowing down long enough to have the home inspected in case there’s a deal-breaking problem with the home hidden beneath the surface. Consider asking the seller to foot the bill for the inspection. Normally, you would be the one who would pay for it, but since the seller is getting a good – and fast – deal by accepting a cash offer, they may be willing to pay for the home inspection. Be prepared to walk away from the deal if the inspection reveals an issue with the home that’s going to require more money than you want to spend after the purchase. If the sellers know that you’ll walk away from the purchase if the issue isn’t fixed, they may be willing to pay to fix it themselves, or cut the price of the home to compensate. Use Experienced Real Estate Experts You stand to lose a lot if your cash deal goes sour because the house is a lemon or there’s a problem with the...

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